[Q&A] How to make complex shape animations with Camtasia

(Click to enlarge.)

(Click to enlarge.)

One of the questions I want to highlight this week from our courses‘ member only Q&A group is this one on the right about replicating moderately complex animations in Camtasia (or ScreenFlow).  That is, beyond the conventional voiceover screencasts that we see a lot on YouTube.

The quick answer is yes.  You can do much of this in any of the “Big 3” screencasting software/editors.

The longer answer:  Here’s the gist of it in the video below.


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A word about third-party plugins for custom text and video animations

I’m admittedly not aware of any third party vendors that support special effects plugins for Camtasia or ScreenFlow — at least not in the way that, say, Noise Industries’ FXFactory installs itself into, say, Final Cut Pro, Motion or Premiere.   Having something like that available would be a HUGE assist in juicing-up the visual quality of your screencasting projects.

I put the question to the Techsmithies (Camtasia) and the Telestream folks (ScreenFlow) and I’ll report back here with their response.   But, I can say that there are a host of third-party suppliers of pre-keyed video and motion graphics clips that provide their media as importable media clips.  A couple you might want to check out include:  Flowtility and Marketing Motion Graphics.

If you have some favorite third-party media vendors, please share them in the comments below.

Tips For Editing and Polishing Your Skype video Interview (Part 3)

Part 3: Editing and Polishing Your Skype Video Interview

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This is part 3 in the 3-part series.  In part 1, I showed you how I arranged the cameras, the microphone and software settings for the interview.  In part 2, I demo’d the recording while showing camera and microphone alignment.  In this video, I’ll show you the end-product of the raw recording; you’ll also see some helpful tips for editing and enhancing your Skype video interview so you can present it to your audience with a little more polish.

Tip:  If you scroll down, you can see a sample of what the final polish might look like.

Note:  It’s worth keeping in mind that although I used Camtasia for Macintosh to demo the recording of this Skype interview, the set up and process for recording is just as easily conducted using Camtasia Studio (for Windows) and ScreenFlow for Macintosh.

P.S.  I used ScreenFlow to record, edit and publish the demo video itself.

A Sample of the Final Interview

The short video above is one quickie example of the polished interview we used as a sample in the tutorial series.

More in this Skype interview screencast series

How to screencast your Skype video interview – Part 2: The Interview

Part 2: Recording the Skype Interview

This is part 2 in the 3-part series.  In part 1, I showed you how I arranged the cameras, the microphone and software settings for the interview.  In this video, we follow up on the settings and proceed with the interview itself via Skype — and we record it with a screencast editor, such as Camtasia or ScreenFlow.

It’s worth keeping in mind that although I used Camtasia for Macintosh to demo the recording of this Skype interview, the set up and process for recording is just as easily conducted using Camtasia Studio (for Windows) and ScreenFlow for Macintosh.

Key highlights

Some of the key points that’ll help you keep things straight in the video above are the following:

  • What did I use the Skype camera angle for?  I used the Skype camera angle to illuminate my profile for the benefit of the interviewee.
  • What did I use the screencast editor’s camera angle for? I used the screencast editor’s camera angle (Camtasia Mac in this case, or also Camtasia Studio or ScreenFlow) to illuminate my profile for the benefit of engaging the audience who later views the interview video online.

image - skype camera angle

image screencast camera angle

More in this Skype interview screencast series