Easy Click-and-Drag Green Screen Videos Using Camtasia Studio

The Abridged Version Of the Green Screen Training Video With Camtasia Studio

Last week I announced the release of Camtasia Studio version 8.1.  Although the list of features included in that release were relatively small, the magnitude of the value in the new features was HUGE.  Among them was the long awaited green screen effect.  (Previously only available on Camtasia for Macintosh and Screenflow for Macintosh.)

udemy-lecture21The video above gives the quick-tip highlights (abridged version) of making green screen work in your videos using Camtasia Studio (for Windows).  You can also click here for a Free preview of the (unabridged) full training video on the Udemy learning network.

A question for you

Have you previously used green screen in any of your screencast presentations or online courses?  What do you think? Did it enhance your presentation? Or is green screen overrated?

[Videos] The poor man’s home video studio: 3 must-watch techniques

So in my online courses I field questions periodically about what my studio setup is like.  (You might be surprised at how much low tech you can get away with!)  The good news, of course, is that you don’t have to spend thousands to produce your online video/screencast courses.

In a nutshell, my setup isn’t too far removed from those Gideon has setup (third video below).  But, with a few minor tweaks (see the first 2 videos) I’m confident that you could easily produce at even higher quality video/screencasts than those you’ll see in my coursework.  So, please don’t use me as your baseline, check out the shoe-string budget creativity that some of our colleagues have put together… then do it!

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Dummies Guide to Drawing Custom Sketch Graphics On the iPad – No Graphic Artistry Required!

No copyright worries…And, you don’t have to be an artist

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Drawn using the iPad 2, Bamboo Stylus, SketchBook Pro. Creative commons: share | attribution | non-commercial

Have you ever worried about possibly violating someone’s copyright when you grab an image from “the wild” to place on your blog? Well, you’re correct to think about it. But, with your iPad, a stylus and the right app, you can get around all that by creating your own custom sketch graphics library from pictures you take yourself.

The best thing about it? You don’t even have to be an artist!

Do you remember back in grade school when we got a kick out of tracing pictures?

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Creative commons | share | attribution | non commercial

I remember my third grade teacher, Mrs. Telgenhoff I think her name was (?), handing out tracing paper, a #2 pencil and some random old magazine to me and my classmates.  Then, for the next half-hour, or so, the whole class would just go to town tracing “grown up” pictures (not to be confused with “adult pictures”) from pages of an old Life or Time magazine.

Then, after tracing them out in pencil on white paper, the real fun would start.  That’s when we brought out the crayons and started filling in the white space in our custom made coloring book.

Now, a couple of decades later — okay, a few decades later — it turns out, we can recoup a lot of that old childhood picture-tracing fun.

The video above shows how you can go to town with images you capture yourself and then trace them out on your iPad using a nifty little app that retails for about $3.  Hey, you can even color it if you want.

And, here’s another little tip:  You can also do this on your computer using a Wacom tablet, stylus and software like Photoshop or the open source image software Gimp.