How to make the ‘magnifying glass map’ effect using Camtasia

green-screen-backThe Green Screen Effect Ain't Just For Talking Heads

In the Fundamentals section (Module 2) of the Digital-Know-How course and Section 2 of the Deep Dive Screencast training course (Camtasia Studio) on Udemy, I teach you how to make the so called "green screen effect" in Camtasia Studio.  However, in the course I model a scenario where we use a video of a live "talking head" subject in order to project him/her onto another background.  But, as you'll see below, the green screen effect isn't just for live subjects.  You can use it, too, to add some creative twists to your eLearning and screencast projects.

"The End"

Credit for this animation goes to David Demyan.  In the first video below, David shows a creative use of the visual properties and green screen ("remove a color") features in Camtasia Studio 8 (for Windows).

Beginning with the end in mind, David first shows the end result of the effect that shows a magnifying glass graphic panning across a map.  As the  graphic pans across, a magnified section of the map appears inside the magnifying glass.  Brilliant!

The "Reveal"

Here's how he did it.

Highlights

  1. Use Camtasia to publish an initial "reference video" that includes the background and a green colored shape that you'll use later as a mask.  This mask will later reveal a "hole" through which you'll see a magnified image.
  2. Create a second screencast video project.
  3. Add a magnified version of the background graphic onto track 1.
  4. Add the reference video from Step 1 (the one that contains the green masking shape) and place it onto track 2.
  5. Use the "remove a color" effect in Camtasia Studio and apply it to the green shape in the reference video.

There are some additional overlays David uses to enhance the context and "theme" of his project.  In the second video above, for example, David uses a magnifying glass graphic as an overlay to the masking shape.  You can use other overlays that match your theme, but the gist of the steps are in the highlights above.

"What if I'm not using Camtasia Studio?"

I'll follow up with another post that shows how you can produce the same effect in Screenflow (for Mac) and Camtasia for Mac.  But, essentially, just as long as your chosen screencast editor will support:

  • multiple tracks,
  • keyframe animations (a.k.a. "video action" in Screenflow; "add animation" in Camtasia)
  • and green screen features (a.k.a., chroma key in Screenflow, "remove a color" in Camtasia)

then you'll be able to effect the same animation that David deftly manages above.

 


Ready to learn the Screencasting Wizard's secrets?Learn to teach online. Go beyond PowerPoint: learn to screencast using Camtasia Studio for Windows, Camtasia for Macintosh, or ScreenFlow for Macintosh. Watch the free previews now and read the topics list on our 5-star rated screencasting courses. Click here to learn more.


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About Mel

Mel is the online training architect and screencasting wizard at Kareo, one of Forbes' 2013 list of 100 Most Promising Companies in America. He's also the creator of Digital-Know-How, a training website devoted to developing learners' skills for screencasting and web video course development. Mel is also the chief blogger of ScreencastingWizard.com; Mel's personal blog. The comments and opinions you read here are Mel's and not associated with any other company.
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  1. Pingback: [Video] How to make the ‘Magnifying Glass Map’ effect in Screenflow | ScreencastingWizard.com

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