Camtasia Tip – Ripple Insert New Clips In the Middle Of A Multi-Track Timeline

It used to the be case that when you wanted to insert a clip in the middle of a complex multi-track project, you’d have to split all clips on all tracks, then zoom all the way out so you can select everything to the right of it and slide everything over.  This needed to happen in order to keep all your callouts, audio, images and video in sync when you shifted everything to the right in order to make room for the new clip.  But, no longer…

Now, when you want to insert a new clip in the middle of your project, you can push the Command key (Camtasia Mac) or the Shift key (Camtasia Studio) while clicking and dragging the playhead.

In the video above, I show a quick demo of the ripple insert feature in Camtasia Studio and Camtasia Mac that you’ll absolutely love me for showing you the next time you’re working on a complex / multi-track project.

Best Screen Capture Software Comparison Series (Ep. 2) – Camtasia Macintosh

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If you’re jumping into this series for the first time, then you’ll want to first take a look at episode 1:  6 Of the Best Screen Capture Software – Compared (Ep. 1).  You’ll also want to subscribe so you get notified when the new updates come online.

In this episode: Camtasia (v2) for Macintosh (Camtasia 2 Mac)

For purposes of having a reasonable standard for comparison, I opted to fly above the “basic” feature sets like:  video and audio capture (duh), annotations, callouts, text overlays, and the like.  I’m conceding that each of the screen capture software programs I’ll be looking at in this series already have that ability.

Rather, what I thought would be better was to use, as a basis for comparison, those features that I don’t always see in ALL screen capture software, AND are those that I’ve found invaluable in my professional screencasts.  I also wanted to keep the list relatively short.

Features For Comparison

Ultimately, I settled on the following five simple (yet highly influential-for-user-experience) features for comparison:

  • Cursor effects and animation (e.g., being able to adjust cursor size; various options for highlighting the cursor; and so on)
  • Capacity for supporting multiple video tracks (i.e., at least 3.)  This is especially helpful for overlaying supporting visuals, websites or other guides that you otherwise verbally reference in your screencast.
  • Capacity for supporting multiple audio tracks (i.e., at least 3)  Helpful for overlaying additional or corrective narration, music tracks, hit files, etc.
  • Pixelation feature.  A simple, yet often not included, tool for masking passwords and other confidential information in video screen captures.
  • Ability to animate and keyframe (same thing?) various annotations and callouts around three axes:  x-, y-, and z-axes.

Executive Summary: How Was Camtasia for Macintosh Ranked?

  • Overall:  5
  • Cursor effects / animation:  5
  • Multiple video tracks:  5
  • Multiple audio tracks: 5
  • Pixelation: 5
  • Annotations / Callouts key-framing around 3 axes: 5