How to make the ‘magnifying glass map’ effect using Camtasia

green-screen-backThe Green Screen Effect Ain’t Just For Talking Heads

In the Fundamentals section (Module 2) of the Digital-Know-How course and Section 2 of the Deep Dive Screencast training course (Camtasia Studio) on Udemy, I teach you how to make the so called “green screen effect” in Camtasia Studio.  However, in the course I model a scenario where we use a video of a live “talking head” subject in order to project him/her onto another background.  But, as you’ll see below, the green screen effect isn’t just for live subjects.  You can use it, too, to add some creative twists to your eLearning and screencast projects.

“The End”

Credit for this animation goes to David Demyan.  In the first video below, David shows a creative use of the visual properties and green screen (“remove a color”) features in Camtasia Studio 8 (for Windows).

Beginning with the end in mind, David first shows the end result of the effect that shows a magnifying glass graphic panning across a map.  As the  graphic pans across, a magnified section of the map appears inside the magnifying glass.  Brilliant!

The “Reveal”

Here’s how he did it.

Highlights

  1. Use Camtasia to publish an initial “reference video” that includes the background and a green colored shape that you’ll use later as a mask.  This mask will later reveal a “hole” through which you’ll see a magnified image.
  2. Create a second screencast video project.
  3. Add a magnified version of the background graphic onto track 1.
  4. Add the reference video from Step 1 (the one that contains the green masking shape) and place it onto track 2.
  5. Use the “remove a color” effect in Camtasia Studio and apply it to the green shape in the reference video.

There are some additional overlays David uses to enhance the context and “theme” of his project.  In the second video above, for example, David uses a magnifying glass graphic as an overlay to the masking shape.  You can use other overlays that match your theme, but the gist of the steps are in the highlights above.

“What if I’m not using Camtasia Studio?”

I’ll follow up with another post that shows how you can produce the same effect in Screenflow (for Mac) and Camtasia for Mac.  But, essentially, just as long as your chosen screencast editor will support:

  • multiple tracks,
  • keyframe animations (a.k.a. “video action” in Screenflow; “add animation” in Camtasia)
  • and green screen features (a.k.a., chroma key in Screenflow, “remove a color” in Camtasia)

then you’ll be able to effect the same animation that David deftly manages above.

 

[Q&A] “Should I get Screenflow? Or Camtasia for Macintosh?”

Here’s this week’s Q&A from my Digital-Know-How course, as well as the “Deep Dive” screencasting courses on Udemy (Camtasia Studio and Camtasia for Macintosh).

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The questions we’re answering this week are:

  • Q&A #1. What’s better…Camtasia for Mac or ScreenFlow? Is it worth buying Camtasia if you already have ScreenFlow?
  • Q&A #2. Is it true that Camtasia for Macintosh supports much more functions than the Windows version?
  • Q&A #3. Mel, I have been thinking of getting a Macintosh, but I work in primarily a Windows environment. To date I have not found a MAC tool that allows me to load Windows like you have in all of your videos. Can you share what you are using?

Your turn

Which screencasting software do you prefer to use?

Easy Click-and-Drag Green Screen Videos Using Camtasia Studio

The Abridged Version Of the Green Screen Training Video With Camtasia Studio

Last week I announced the release of Camtasia Studio version 8.1.  Although the list of features included in that release were relatively small, the magnitude of the value in the new features was HUGE.  Among them was the long awaited green screen effect.  (Previously only available on Camtasia for Macintosh and Screenflow for Macintosh.)

udemy-lecture21The video above gives the quick-tip highlights (abridged version) of making green screen work in your videos using Camtasia Studio (for Windows).  You can also click here for a Free preview of the (unabridged) full training video on the Udemy learning network.

A question for you

Have you previously used green screen in any of your screencast presentations or online courses?  What do you think? Did it enhance your presentation? Or is green screen overrated?

Camtasia Tip – Ripple Insert New Clips In the Middle Of A Multi-Track Timeline

It used to the be case that when you wanted to insert a clip in the middle of a complex multi-track project, you’d have to split all clips on all tracks, then zoom all the way out so you can select everything to the right of it and slide everything over.  This needed to happen in order to keep all your callouts, audio, images and video in sync when you shifted everything to the right in order to make room for the new clip.  But, no longer…

Now, when you want to insert a new clip in the middle of your project, you can push the Command key (Camtasia Mac) or the Shift key (Camtasia Studio) while clicking and dragging the playhead.

In the video above, I show a quick demo of the ripple insert feature in Camtasia Studio and Camtasia Mac that you’ll absolutely love me for showing you the next time you’re working on a complex / multi-track project.